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Schenker & Co. GmbH, Central Management

Schenker and Deutsche Bundesbahn - Part 3

When Deutsche Bundesbahn was founded in 1949, the previously separate management entities of Schenker were brought together as Schenker & Co. GmbH, Central Management West, Frankfurt/Main.

Together with Schenker, Deutsche Bundesbahn also had direct or indirect holdings in numerous other transport companies. This enabled it to act with greater flexibility on the market, offering services that it could not perform adequately if at all.

Schenker was therefore an important element in Deutsche Bundesbahn's transport policy. One of the 1984 issues of "Schenker Welt" states that "First and foremost, Schenker is a key-account customer of Deutsche Bundesbahn, with many shared interests in terms of the transport business. Deutsche Bundesbahn is Europe's largest transport company, with the parent/subsidiary relationship proving advantageous for both sides ….. These activities are significant for the whole transport industry".

Since then, it has always been part of the corporate philosophy that what counts is Schenker's contribution to the overall financial success of the Deutsche Bundesbahn group - according to Rainer Gohlke, Chairman of the Management Board at Bundesbahn and Chairman of the Supervisory Board at Schenker.

Deutsche Bundesbahn was Schenker's sole shareholder. In the early 1960s, Schenker's supervisory board was made up solely of representatives from Deutsche Bundesbahn and affiliated companies. From the end of the '70s, Deutsche Bundesbahn and the private sector each held three seats on the supervisory board, with six seats for the workforce. But as a rule, the board was chaired by Deutsche Bundesbahn, usually in the person of the President.

Following the international trend for governments to withdraw increasingly from private business, in March 1985 the German government decided to proceed with partial privatisation of Schenker. In August 1989, Stinnes AG, Mülheim a. d. Ruhr acquired 22.5% of Schenker Co. GmbH. In 1991, the Stinnes Group increased its stake in Schenker to 80%. For the time being, this was the end of Schenker's role as Deutsche Bundesbahn's forwarding company.

Last modified: 03.04.2012

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